iVoM Past Events

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iVoM2 #1: Control on viral action

Date:

December 8th, 2021 at 12:00 PM (noon) CET

Systematic and quantitative view of the antiviral arsenal of prokaryotes

Dr. Aude Bernheim Profile Image

Dr. Aude Bernheim

INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research)

The sleeper within - how endogenous virophages may defend protists against giant viruses

Prof. Martin Polz Profile Image

Prof. Martin Polz

Univ Vienna, Austria

The dynamics of bacterial innate defenses against phage

Dr. Matthias Fischer Profile Image

Dr. Matthias Fischer

Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany

Chairs

Dr. Aleksandra Petrovic Fabijan Profile Image

Westmead Institute for Medical Research and University of Sydney, Australia

Prof. Corina Brussaard Profile Image

Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands

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iVoM2 #2: Raiders of the third domain

Date:

January 10th, 2022 at 9:00 PM CET

Infection of the halophilic archaeal virus HFTV1

Dr. Tessa Quax Profile Image

Dr. Tessa Quax

Univ Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, Groningen, The Netherlands

Viral-mutualism in microbial populations with CRISPR-Cas immunity

Prof. Rachel Whitaker Profile Image

Prof. Rachel Whitaker

Dept Microbiology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA

Spindles of Doom

Prof. Ken Stedman Profile Image

Prof. Ken Stedman

Biology Department and Center for Life in Extreme Environments, Portland State University

Chairs

Dr. Matthias Fischer Profile Image

Dr. Matthias Fischer

Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany

Prof. Corina Brussaard Profile Image

Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands

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iVoM2 #3: Phage application in the One Health approach

Date:

2 pm CET, Wednesday, February 2nd, 2022

Using phage to detect low levels of Mycobacteria in blood samples from cattle, lions and humans

Dr. Cath Rees Profile Image

Professor of Microbiology, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham

Reporter mycobacteriophages for TB diagnosis

Prof. Mariana Piuri Profile Image

Prof. Mariana Piuri

School of Exact and Natural Sciences (FCEN), University of Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina

There’s a phage for that

Prof. Lone Brøndsted Profile Image

University of Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences Section for Food Safety and Zoonoses

Chairs

Dr. Matthias Fischer Profile Image

Dr. Matthias Fischer

Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany

Dr. Aleksandra Petrovic Fabijan Profile Image

Westmead Institute for Medical Research and University of Sydney, Australia

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iVoM2 #4: Endless virus diversity most beautiful

Date:

6 pm CET, Tuesday, February 22nd, 2022

Fungal and oomycete viruses with persistent lifestyles and unprecedented genome organizations

Dr. Eeva Vainio Profile Image

Dr. Eeva Vainio

Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke)

Diversity of Giant Viruses

Prof. Frank Aylward Profile Image

Prof. Frank Aylward

Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA

Revisioning RNA viruses in the Sea

Prof. Curtis Suttle Profile Image

Prof. Curtis Suttle

Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, UBC

Chairs

Dr. Matthias Fischer Profile Image

Dr. Matthias Fischer

Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany

Prof. Corina Brussaard Profile Image

Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands

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iVoM2 #5: Environmental impact of virus-host interactions

Date:

2 pm CET, Tuesday, March 15th, 2022

Coupling metagenomics to correlative microscopy for identification of novel viruses in the deep biosphere

Prof. Alexander Probst Profile Image

Prof. Alexander Probst

University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany

From phage to shark: microbial and macrobial predation govern state transitions on coral reefs

Dr. Cynthia Silveira Profile Image

Dr. Cynthia Silveira

International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB)

Harnessing virus for alleviating plant stress

Dr. Neeti Sanan-Mishra Profile Image

Dr. Neeti Sanan-Mishra

International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB)

Chairs

Dr. Matthias Fischer Profile Image

Dr. Matthias Fischer

Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany

Prof. Corina Brussaard Profile Image

Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands

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iVoM2 #6: Models for viral action

Date:

6 pm CET, 12 April 2022

Modeling the Ecological and Therapeutic Impacts of Bacteriophage - an Imperfect Predator

Prof. Joshua Weitz Profile Image

Prof. Joshua Weitz

Georgia Tech, USA

Why are there so many short prophages? The genetic repertoire of active and cryptic prophage sequences.

Prof. Lindi Wahl Profile Image

Prof. Lindi Wahl

Western University, Canada

Lord of the Broken Rings: how ATPase ring motors drive genome packaging in dsDNA viruses

Dr. Marc Morais Profile Image

Dr. Marc Morais

Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB Health), USA

Chairs

Dr. Matthias Fischer Profile Image

Dr. Matthias Fischer

Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany

Prof. Corina Brussaard Profile Image

Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands

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iVoM2 #7: Personalised phage therapy

Date:

3 pm CET, Tuesday, May 3rd, 2022 Note: 9am Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Therapeutic phage monitoring in children

Dr. Ameneh Khatami Profile Image

Dr. Ameneh Khatami

University of Sydney, Australia

Quality Control of Phage APIs for human therapeutic use

Dr. Pieter-Jan Ceyssens Profile Image

Dr. Pieter-Jan Ceyssens

Sciensano, Belgium

...and meanwhile in the Israeli Phage Therapy Center (IPTC)

Prof. Ronen Hazan Profile Image

Prof. Ronen Hazan

Institute of Biomedical and Oral Research (IBOR)

Chairs

Dr. Matthias Fischer Profile Image

Dr. Matthias Fischer

Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany

Prof. Corina Brussaard Profile Image

Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands

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iVoM #6: Biotechnology applications in health care

Date:

(New Date): Thursday, March 4, 11am GMT

Phages (in)action in the gut

Since a decade we are studying how virulent phages target bacterial cells within the intestinal tract of mammals using different murine models. I will briefly reviewed what we learned about phage-bacteria interactions in the gut and how this knowledge can help understanding these dynamics in relation to human health.

Laurent Debarbieux Profile Image

Department of Microbiology, Institut Pasteur, F-75015 Paris

A study that went wrong- phage engineering and phage pharmacokinetics

Krystyna Dabrowska Profile Image

Krystyna Dabrowska

Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wrocław, Poland

Phage therapy experience in France in the field of Bone and Joint infection

Phage therapy has been historically used to treat patients with bone and joint infections, with contradictory results. As bacteriophages have anti-biofilm effect, they are nevertheless promising to treat such infections, especially in the era of antimicrobial resistance. Since 2017, we implemented a multidisciplinary group dedicated to phage therapy for patients with complex bone and joint infection. We found that phage therapy has the potential to keep the function in patients with severe relapsing prosthetic joint infection. Based on our experience, identifying relevant clinical indications (such as prosthetic joint infection), and having multidisciplinary approach with international academic collaborations and interactions with national health authority and industry, are essential to go ahead and develop phage therapy in a close future.

Tristan Ferry Profile Image

Centre interrégional de Référence pour la prise en charge des Infections Ostéo-Articulaires complexes (CRIOAc Lyon), Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France

Chairs

Jeremy Barr Profile Image

School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, VIC, Australia.

Joana Azeredo Profile Image

CEB - Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal

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iVoM #5: Agro-food, veterinary and environmental biotechnology applications

Date:

Thursday, January 21, 4pm GMT

Engineered phages for environmental monitoring

Phages were genetically engineered to contain reporter enzymes and allow for covalent and oriented conjugation on magnetic nanoparticles. The phages were used to detect E. coli in drinking water and provided and compared favourably to current testing methods.

Sam R. Nugen Profile Image

Department of Food Science and Technology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

Encapsulation of bacteriophages for targeted delivery and controlled release

The talk will cover encapsulation approaches that can be used for bacteriophages including spray drying, microfluidic and membrane emulsification methods. Encapsulation affords phages protection from environmental and processing stresses. Phages administered via the oral route may lose activity upon exposure to gastric acidity and enzymatic activity. Targeted delivery and controlled release of high tires of phages may significantly improve phage treatment outcomes. Experimental results using pH triggered responsive formulations will be presented.

Danish J. Malik Profile Image

Chemical Engineering Department, Loughborough University, UK

Phage therapy in Apiculture - prospects

American Foulbrood (AFB) is a bacterial disease affecting honeybees, with no currently available treatment. The infectious process begins when adult bees provide spore-contaminated food to their larvae. We investigated the possibility of using phages to control AFB, orally administered to adult bees, by characterizing phage safety, biodistribution and activity in hive conditions.

Ana Oliveira Profile Image

Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal

Chairs

Mathias Middelboe Profile Image

Department of Biology, Marine Biological Section, University of Copenhagen, Helsingør, Denmark

Prof. Lone Brøndsted Profile Image

University of Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences Section for Food Safety and Zoonoses

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iVoM #4: Virus-host interaction: molecular mechanisms

Date:

Thursday, December 17, 7pm GMT

New discoveries on the immune system of bacteria

The talk will described recent discoveries on new mechanisms by which bacteria defend themselves against phages.

Rotem Sorek Profile Image

Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel

The regulation and activity of Class 1 CRISPR-Cas systems

Bacteria CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against bacteriophages and mobile genetic elements. Although some bacteria modulate CRISPR-Cas in response to population density and other factors, a lack of high-throughput methods to systematically reveal regulators has hampered efforts to understand when and how immune strategies are deployed. Here, I will discuss multiple regulatory networks controlling CRISPR-Cas immunity that we have discovered through our development and application of a robust genome-wide approach.

Peter Fineran Profile Image

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand

Molecular hijacking of Pseudomonas

The molecular hijacking of the bacterial cell is driven by a remarkable diversity of phage-encoded mechanisms that modify replication, transcription and (post)translational modifications within the cell. In future, these systems may be exploited for antibacterial design strategies and biotechnological applications.

Rob Lavigne Profile Image

ISVM President-Elect; KU Leuven, Department of Biosystems, Laboratory of Gene Technology, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21 - box 2462, B-3001, Leuven, Belgium.

Chairs

Karen L. Maxwell Profile Image

Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

Julia Frunzke Profile Image

Institute of Bio- und Geosciences, IBG-1: Biotechnology, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany

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iVoM #3: Virus-host interaction: overcoming cell barriers

Date:

Thursday, November 19, 4pm GMT

Sweet and sour: how cell surface glycosylation affects phage sensitivity and virulence

Bacteriophages frequently use cell-wall carbohydrates as specific ligands for recognition and binding, important for both entry and exit from a bacterial host cell. While phage challenge may result in altered surface glycosylation of resistant bacteria, these mutants often suffer from significant trade-offs between gain of phage insensitivity and attenuation of virulence, environmental fitness, or other properties. I will present the case of the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, where phage-induced loss of specific sugars from cell wall teichoic acids results in serovar conversion and lack of cell wall-associated virulence factors.

Martin J. Loessner Profile Image

Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

License to lyse: factors impacting endolysin lytic action on Gram-positive bacteria

Recombinant phage endolysins can in general access the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria because these lack an outer membrane. Under favourable conditions, the enzymes can cut the cell wall and cause cell lysis, setting the basis for their exploration as enzybiotics. However, in conditions promoting bacterial growth, cells can be much less susceptible to endolysin attack. In this talk I will present factors involved in this endolysin tolerance and how to subvert it to improve lysis. I will also briefly mention other endolysin features that have been, so far, mostly disregarded.

Carlos São-José Profile Image

University of Lisbon; iMed.ULisboa, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

Plaque development reveals a mode of bacterial tolerance to phage

We investigated plaque development by lytic phages infecting their Bacillus subtilis host. We revealed that plaque spread is limited by activation of a transient phage tolerance response in non-infected bacteria in response to lysis of their neighbors. This temporary tolerance is achieved by remodeling of bacterial surface components to restrict phage attachment.

Sigal Ben-Yehuda Profile Image

Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Chairs

Ry Young Profile Image

Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

Madalena Pimentel Profile Image

iMed.ULisboa, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

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iVoM #2: Virus structures and function

Date:

Thursday, October 15, 4pm GMT

Structure and function of central spike proteins

Phages with contractile tails carry a central spike complex at the membrane-attacking end of the tail tube. Depending on the system, the central spike complex can be encoded by one, two, or three separate genes. In this talk, we will discuss the structure and function of central spike complex components.

Petr Leiman Profile Image

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas, TX, USA

Giant Viral Infection Mechanisms: Dropping acid makes you see stars

I will talk about the extraordinary stability of recently discovered giant viruses. This work is related to developing methods to trigger capsid opening in vitro. Evolutionarily divergent giant viruses share a common biochemical mechanism. We paired this opening protocol with cryo-EM and mass spectrometry to reveal intermediates states during capsid opening and to identify the proteins released from the capsid into the cell during the initial entry step. Since these viruses are so complex, many of these proteins have no known function or structures. Therefore identifying which ones are released during entry will set us up for downstream studies to tease apart how many of these “hypothetical” viral proteins work in the life cycle of these viruses.

Kristin N. Parent Profile Image

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, MI, USA

Phage capsids turned into versatile nanocarriers

Tailed DNA bacteriophages are the most ubiquitous viruses on earth. Their icosahedral capsids are highly robust and stable macromolecular assemblies that contain and protect the viral genome. Despite their size diversity, phage capsids are assembled in a conserved stepwise and tightly regulated process. The large capsid of bacteriophage T5 is a model of choice to understand the molecular mechanisms sustaining the sequential events that take place during capsid assembly. I will discuss how this knowledge opens avenues in engineering nanocarriers of major therapeutic and biotechnological interest.

Pascale Boulanger Profile Image

Institute for Integrative Biology of the Cell (I2BC), CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, France

Chairs

Deborah M. Hinton Profile Image

Gene Expression and Regulation Section, Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, MD, USA

Paulo Tavares Profile Image

Institut de Biologie Intégrative de la Cellule (I2BC), CEA, CNRS, Univ Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, France.

iVoM #1: Ecology and evolution of microbial viruses

Date:

Thursday, September 17, 11am GMT

Spread of viruses: Global, Regional and Local distributions of crAssphage

The most widespread human phage - crAssphage - has been found in 2/3 of the countries on the planet so far, but the genomic signatures belie global dissemination and demonstrate unique regional and local evolution.

Rob Edwards Profile Image

Rob Edwards

Flinders University, Australia

Diversity in marine algal virus host relationships and their effect on phytoplankton community structure

Haptophytes are key components of the phytoplankton community in the ocean, playing important roles both as primary producers and as mixotrophs that graze on bacteria and protists. In this talk I will discuss the adaptive evolution of haptophyte-infecting viruses, from those that cause acute infections to those that stably coexist with their host, and identify traits of importance for successful survival in the ocean.

Ruth-Anne Sandaa Profile Image

University of Bergen, Norway

The story of CrAssphage – so far

CrAssphage are the most abundant bacteriophage in the human gut, representing more than 90% of the total phage population in some individuals. It is an unusual phage that has co-evolved with the human microbiome and has an unusual lifestyle in that it co-exists with its bacterial host in high numbers. I will discuss our progress so far in understanding this abundant but elusive phage.

Colin Hill Profile Image

University College Cork, Ireland

Chairs

Debbie Lindell Profile Image

Faculty of Biology at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

Prof. Corina Brussaard Profile Image

Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands